Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Review: Cunt: A Declaration of Independence by Inga Muscio

Title: Cunt: A Declaration of Independence
Author: Inga Muscio
Publisher: Seal Press
Pages: 304
Genres: Non Fiction, Feminism, Narrative

Cunt
An ancient title of respect for women, the word “cunt” long ago veered off this noble path. Inga Muscio traces the road from honor to expletive, giving women the motivation and tools to claim “cunt” as a positive and powerful force in their lives. With humor and candor, she shares her own history as she explores the cultural forces that influence women’s relationships with their bodies.

Sending out a call for every woman to be the Cuntlovin’ Ruler of Her Sexual Universe, Muscio stands convention on its head by embracing all things cunt-related.
I have no doubt that this book inspired some people whilst reading. I am not one of those people. Inga Muscio's particular style of feminism is unique to say the least. Sadly, there is not much to offer anyone who does not subscribe to the 'Goddess' or rejects anything written, invented or created by men. I am sure I am not alone in saying that I do not want to use a washable sea sponge as an alternative to a tampon and I definitely do not want to swap adhesive pads for a 'blood towel' tied around my waist.

There are a few good points raised by Muscio that were interesting and thought provoking but on the whole I found her radical feminism a bit aggressive and dated. The idea that an enlightened woman should not use any form of contraception apart from condoms (because they are made by men for men so are okay), and then subsequently 'will' away unwanted pregnancies is just insanity. The graphic description of the author's abortions nauseated me badly and I wish I was given a warning beforehand.

In the revised second edition, there is a massive info dump at the end where Muscio attempts to include all of the social issues that have ever existed that she forgot to mention in the first edition of her book. The origin and etymology of the word 'cunt' is never really explored or addressed satisfactorily which is a shame because that could have been fascinating. A disappointing and bizarre read, I don't recommend it.


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